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Lockheed SR-71
Lockheed SR-71 front view
(U.S. Air Force photo)



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SR-71 in flight
Lockheed SR-71 in flight
(U.S. Air Force photo)

WE NEED YOUR OPINION!

Flight of the Black Limousine by Dan Witkoff

 
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We would like to get your opinion.  What you are looking at is an original painting by Dan Witkoff of the CIA version of the SR-71.  Not only is it free of most identifying markings, but it is flying at 80,000+feet, at 3000+miles per hour.

If we were to have a limited edition of 300 full color lithographs published, with an overall sheet size approximately 21X36, image size approximately 16X32,  signed by the artist for $149.00, would you be interested in purchasing this piece of artwork?

Please let us know positive or negative and express any opinion you may have about the look of the piece. 

ALSO, PLEASE CLINK THIS LINK TO VIEW MORE OF OUR COLLECTIBLES:

http://stores.shop.ebay.com/aviation-and-space-collectibles

   
   

 

   
   

Description:

FLIGHT OF THE BLACK LIMOUSINE

New Release

This futuristic looking aircraft even today, was actually built in the 1960s. It was said that designer Kelly Johnson first sketched out the SR-71 on a napkin.

Developed at Lockheed Aircraft's "Skunkworks" plant in the high desert of California, it soon became the most talked about spyplane of its day, on up to it's retirement in the 1990s.

Reaching speeds in excess of 3,000+mph and altitudes beyond 86,000 feet, there was no possible way the SR-71 could be brought down.

In this limited edition lithograph you see the Blackbird painted in it's C.I.A. markings at a height higher than stated and at a speed well beyond officially allowed. Due to the lack of atmosphere, the altitude, and speed, the Blackbird's leading edges begin to glow, much the same way any object glows upon re-entry from space. With the spikes retracted to heir fullest position, the SR-71 sucks in all the possible air available at that height to power its mighty 32,500 lb. J-58 engines.

 

 

   
         
       
 
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